What May Cause Calcaneal Spur

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Overview

A heel spur is caused by the displacement of calcium on the bone that forms on the underside of the heel, it may be one small bony protrusion or a collection of tiny, irregularly shaped growths on the bone of the heel, which is called the calcaneum. Heel spurs are sometimes painful, described as a knife digging into the heel and other times, a heel spur goes unnoticed and is only detected by an X-ray.

Causes

Though this syndrome is most common in individuals 40 years or older, it can occur at any age. The following factors increase the likelihood of heel spur development. An uneven gait which applies too much pressure to certain areas of the foot. Being overweight. Wearing worn shoes or ill-fitting footwear. Job conditions that require long periods spent standing or lifting heavy objects. The normal aging process which results in a decrease in ligament elasticity.

Posterior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Most heel spurs cause no symptoms and may go undetected for years. If they cause no pain or discomfort, they require no treatment. Occasionally, a bone spur will break off from the larger bone, becoming a ?loose body?, floating in a joint or embedding itself in the lining of the joint. This can cause pain and intermittent locking of the joint. In the case of heel spurs, sharp pain and discomfort is felt on the bottom of the foot or heel.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of a heel spur can be done with an x-ray, which will be able to reveal the bony spur. Normally, it occurs where the plantar fascia connects to the heel bone. When the plantar fascia ligament is pulled excessively it begins to pull away from the heel bone. When this excessive pulling occurs, it causes the body to respond by depositing calcium in the injured area, resulting in the formation of the bone spur. The Plantar fascia ligament is a fibrous band of connective tissue running between the heel bone and the ball of the foot. This structure maintains the arch of the foot and distributes weight along the foot as we walk. However, due to the stress that this ligament must endure, it can easily become damaged which commonly occurs along with heel spurs.

Non Surgical Treatment

Heel spurs are considered a self-limited condition, which means that by making small alterations in your lifestyle and regular routines you can often control the condition. The goal is to relieve pain, reduce friction and transfer pressure from your sensitive foot areas. By eliminating the cause of the heel spur and plantar fasciitis (i.e. better shoes, orthotics to fix your gait, losing weight) will help reduce the pressure put on your fascia and heel and can reduce the inflammation caused by your heel spur. Failure to see improvements after conservative treatments may make surgery your only option.

Surgical Treatment

Have surgery if no other treatments work. Before performing surgery, doctors usually give home treatments and improved footwear about a year to work. When nothing else eases the pain, here’s what you need to know about surgical options. Instep plantar fasciotomy. Doctors remove part of the plantar fascia to ease pressure on the nerves in your foot. Endoscopy. This surgery performs the same function as an instep plantar fasciotomy but uses smaller incisions so that you’ll heal faster. However, endoscopy has a higher rate of nerve damage, so consider this before you opt for this option. Be prepared to wear a below-the-knee walking cast to ease the pain of surgery and to speed the healing process. These casts, or “boots,” usually work better than crutches to speed up your recovery time.

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Learn How To Protect Against Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Heel Spur

Overview

A calcaneal spur (or heel spur) is a small osteophyte (bone spur) located on the calcaneus (heel bone). Calcaneal spurs are typically detected by a radiological examination (X-ray). When a foot bone is exposed to constant stress, calcium deposits build up on the bottom of the heel bone. Generally, this has no effect on a person’s daily life. However, repeated damage can cause these deposits to pile up on each other,causing a spur-shaped deformity, called a calcaneal (or heel) spur. Obese people, flatfooted people, and women who constantly wear high-heeled shoes are most susceptible to heel spurs. An inferior calcaneal spur is located on the inferior aspect of the calcaneus and is typically a response to plantar fasciitis over a period, but may also be associated with ankylosing spondylitis (typically in children). A posterior calcaneal spur develops on the back of the heel at the insertion of the Achilles tendon. An inferior calcaneal spur consists of a calcification of the calcaneus, which lies superior to the plantar fascia at the insertion of the plantar fascia. A posterior calcaneal spur is often large and palpable through the skin and may need to be removed as part of the treatment of insertional Achilles tendonitis. These are also generally visible to the naked eye.

Causes

Common causes of this bone spur in the heel are repetitive trauma to the base of the heel, obesity, poor walking/running technique, poorly fitting shoes, or hereditary conditions.

Posterior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

It is important to be aware that heel spurs may or may not cause symptoms. Symptoms are usually related to the plantar fasciitis. You may experience significant pain and it may be worse in the morning when you first wake up or during certain physical activities such as, walking, jogging, or running.

Diagnosis

Most patients who are suffering with heel spurs can see them with an X-ray scan. They are normally hooked and extend into the heel. Some people who have heel spur may not even have noticeable symptoms, although could still be able to see a spur in an X-ray scan.

Non Surgical Treatment

Only in rare cases do the symptoms of heel spurs fail to be resolved through conservative treatment. Conservative treatment, although not 100% effective, is successful in most cases and should be given ample time to work. In many cases, conservative methods should be utilized as long as a year depending on the rate at which your body responds to the treatment. When treatment is unsuccessful, surgery may be considered. A common surgical procedure for this condition is plantar fascia release surgery. In this procedure, the tension of the plantar fascia ligament is released, lessening tension in the heel and helping to prevent damage.

Surgical Treatment

Have surgery if no other treatments work. Before performing surgery, doctors usually give home treatments and improved footwear about a year to work. When nothing else eases the pain, here’s what you need to know about surgical options. Instep plantar fasciotomy. Doctors remove part of the plantar fascia to ease pressure on the nerves in your foot. Endoscopy. This surgery performs the same function as an instep plantar fasciotomy but uses smaller incisions so that you’ll heal faster. However, endoscopy has a higher rate of nerve damage, so consider this before you opt for this option. Be prepared to wear a below-the-knee walking cast to ease the pain of surgery and to speed the healing process. These casts, or “boots,” usually work better than crutches to speed up your recovery time.

Images Of Heel Spurs?

I need some advice here. I have heel spurs on both my feet but the left one has bothered me for over two years now. I had the surgery to release the ligament on the bottom of the foot which only worked for about a year (almost exactly). After surgery I went to P.T., did my stretches at home and all that post op jazz. I had custom made orthodics that KILL my feet and at my doctor’s discretion told me to stop wearing them. I could not get my insurance to approve the less invasive surgery (something to do with magnetic something-not sure of the name here).

The plantar fascia is a band of fibrous connective tissue that, lying atop the cushioning layers of fatty tissue that constitute the bottom of the foot, extends from the heel bone to the ball of the foot. Stress from mechanical problems, injury or overuse can cause the plantar fascia to become inflamed, creating pain. Plantar means the bottom of the foot; fascia is a term for this kind of fibrous connective tissue that is found throughout the body; fasciitis refers to inflammation of the fascia tissue. May 24, 2010 By Jody Murray Photo Caption Foot pain is common. Photo Credit plante de pied image by Jean-Paul Bounine from Fotolia.comheel spur stretches

Heel spurs as the name suggests affect the heels and causes a lot of pain in the area especially in the morning just after you get up from sleep. It basically leads to the inflammation of the heels and thus the pains that you suffer from. In simple words, if we try to define heel spurs it is the deposit of tiny calcium beads in the bone. Any damage induced to the heel , posture or feet are also this problem causes. Injuries that occurs during running, running or walking is the result of weakened bone and muscle mass.

Heel spurs can be the most painful cause. A heel spur is a bony structure that grows abnormally from the heel bone. Although heel spurs are not always symptomatic, they are often excruciatingly painful and make walking extremely difficult. Heel spurs cause tenderness and pain at the back of the heel (if associated with Achilles tendonitis) or underneath the sole (if associated with plantar fasciitis). Anti inflammatory drugs are recommended for therapy of heel spurs. Although over the counter ache relievers work well for beating soreness sign, it’s safer to administer just doctor prescribed drugs. For continual ache in the heel region, cortisone procedure is delivered for healing heel spurs.heel spur treatments

Surgery – Only about 10 percent of the people that are afflicted with plantar fasciitis actually end up with surgery to resolve the issue. In most cases, the previously mentioned treatments work out. Doctors are reluctant to go as far as surgery. The results are not always positive and it’s possible that the results will be disappointing. Your doctor will explain the chances of success and will fill you in on the reasonable expectations you should have. Reduce the pain by icing with a frozen water bottle (bottle on the floor and roll the painful part of the foot back and forth across the bottle – gradually increasing the pressure)

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